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Ways of using social media – not the duration – may up mental disorders: study

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AIMAN INAM

FLORIDA: The world is on the cusp of digital revolution and regarding this innumerable studies are being conducted.

A recent study has contradicted the belief that extreme use of social media triggers mental chaos.

As a matter of fact, not the sum of time we spend on social media but the ways young folks use it might cause mental health mayhems.

Savants are of the view that vaguebooking (social media posts) harbors unclear and bogus but sensational, sort of cry for help like stuff and this is, in fact, associated with suicidal thoughts.

In this connection, the study lead author from the University of Central Florida (UCF), Chloe Berryman stated that the major motive of the research was to focus on the behavior of individuals instead of pretending social media to be the wreak of all socio-personal concerns.

For carrying this study out, academics have been through the records of some 467 young adults. They have been canvassed apropos their social media usage, personal and emotional lives.

Moreover, the participants were also asked about the levels of their anxiety, aptitude to empathize, occurrence of suicidal thoughts as well as family and social support networks etc.

Their ramifications revealed that those, who wrote distressing posts, have been reported with suicidal thoughts. Besides, no link was found amid the time spending on social media and symptoms of psychological distress.

It is pertinent to mention here that those folks, who feel lonely and heartbroken, are more prone to open up about goings-on in their personal life upon such sites.

Their up shots have been reported in the paper published in the journal Psychiatric Quarterly.

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Health

Affordable way to prevent stunting: An egg a day makes young people grow taller!

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KARACHI: Whether soft or hard-boiled, fried or whisked into an omelette, eggs appear to give infants a boost.

According to a report published in Pediatrics (journal published by American Academy of Pediatrics), egg could be an affordable answer to the menace of stunting (that leaves children too short for their age). 

Researchers hold that first two years of life are critical for growth and development and stunting is largely irreversible.

They further point out that poor nutrition is a major cause of stunting, along with childhood infections and illnesses.

According to WHO 155 million children under the age of five are stunted. Most live in low-and middle-income countries and health experts have been looking at ways to tackle the issue.

ONE EGG A DAY: 

Half of the 160 youngsters who took part in a random trial were fed an egg a day for six months – the others were monitored for comparison. Families were visited every week to ensure the plan’s regularity and to check for any allergies or side effects.

Stunting was reduced in the treatment group by the end of the study. Occurrence was 47% less than in the non-egg group, even though egg-fed infants were considered short for their age at the start.

Some of the children in the control group did eat eggs, but nowhere near as many as the treatment group.

The lead researcher said: “We were surprised by just how effective this intervention proved to be, and what’s great is the affordability for populations vulnerable to hidden hunger or nutritional deficiency.”

It was noted that eggs were great food for young children with small stomachs: “Eggs contain a combination of nutrients, which we think is important.”

A lead nutritionist at the Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health, said: “In a way, it is surprising that more research has not been conducted using egg in this situation – although in some cultures, parents do not necessarily find egg to be an acceptable early food due to allergy concerns.

Lead researcher advised that eggs should always be well-cooked to avoid any potential infection risk.   Eggs are a good nutritious complementary food that can be introduced as part of a varied diet once the mother decides to start complementary feeding, never before four months.”

WHO recommends mothers worldwide to:

* Exclusively breastfeed infants for the child’s first six months to achieve optimal growth, development and health.

* After the first six months, infants should be given nutritious complementary foods and continue breastfeeding up to the age of two years or beyond.

British Nutrition Foundation maintains:

* While eggs are a nutritious food to include, it’s very essential for young children to have a variety of foods in a diet. Necessary to get all the vitamins and minerals needed, but also to become familiar with a wide range of tastes and textures.

* A range of protein-rich foods should be provided when feeding young children, which can include eggs but can also feature beans, pulses, fish, especially oily fish, meat and dairy products.

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Health

Anti-Polio vaccination campaign begins today in Pakistan!

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ISLAMABAD: An anti-polio vaccination campaign began today in different parts of the country.
The campaign is scheduled to be run in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Baluchistan, Federally Administered Tribal Areas (Fata), Gilgit Baltistan and Azad Kashmir for three days, while in Rawalpindi and Karachi it will continue for six  days.
Around 2.3 million children up to age five years will be administered anti-polio drops in 188 union councils of Karachi during the campaign.
In Fata and KPK, over 6.7 million children will be vaccinated. In Rawalpindi, 811,000 children would be administered polio drops and 2.4 will be vaccinated in Baluchistan.
Similarly, the government planned to vaccinated 1.75 million children.

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Health

Avoid depression to live longer!

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TORONTO: People who suffer from depression may not live as long as persons who don’t experience this mental health disarray, a Canadian study suggests.

Researchers went through six decades of mental health and mortality data on 3,410 adults during three time periods: 1952 to 1967, 1968 to 1990 and 1991 to 2011.

It transpired that depression was related to the risk of early death in every decade of the study for men and (starting in the 1990s for) women.

The connection between shorter lifespan and depression emerge strongest in the years following a depressive episode, leading the researchers to conclude that at least part of the risk might be minimized by effectively treating the mental illness.

Depression has long been associated to different kinds of health problems. It may lead to physiological changes in the body and  develop unhealthy habits like a poor diet, inactivity, smoking and excessive drinking.

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